Automotive Industry – The Fascinating History

It is always fascinating to take a look at the creation of products that we rely on so unconsciously in our daily lives. None is more exciting than the history of the automotive industry. History credits a French engineer by the name of Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot for building the first automobile in 1769. This vehicle was more like a military tractor with three wheels than what we know of as a car. The engine ran on steam and could only run for fifteen minutes at a time. The steam engine evolved as various inventors were able to obtain patents and in 1806 the trend started with cars operating with internal combustion engines which ran on gasoline.The history of the automotive industry truly came of age in 1903 when Henry Ford started an automobile empire in a converted factory. His company became one of the few to survive the Great Depression. In 1914 Ford started producing cars in bulk by creating what we know as assembly lines. This was the point where the automobile began its popularity. The U.S. dominated the industry around the world until the end of World War II in 1945. At that time nations that were technologically advanced such as Germany and Japan were able to gain momentum and become serious competition within the automobile industry.The success seen in the history of the automotive industry is due to three basic factors; price, quality and depreciation. Cars have always continued to get more expensive. A car such as a Cadillac Seville, as an example, retailed for around $20,000 in 1989. That same car in a model produced just five years later retailed at $36,000. The quality of cars continues to evolve as well. They are truly built to last. The depreciation of new cars continues to remain consistent. You can expect a car to lose about 28% of its value the moment it is driven off the dealership lot.The history of the automotive industry would not be complete without a look into the future. With the trend of manufacturers to produce “green” vehicles we are seeing a surge of hybrid and hydrogen cars with many new and innovative ideas waiting for production. The goal is to produce a vehicle that is environmentally safe while still cost effective and affordable. Cars that we only dream about today are destined to become a reality tomorrow.

Force the Change in the Automotive Industry

It is time for you, the average consumer, to take a stand!Fellow consumer, for years we have been taken to the cleaners from the automotive industry: It is time for us to demand change in product quality and how the automotive industry conducts business! As consumers, we need to pressure the industry to change course and give us the best product and service they can or let them die – let them go bankrupt! If a few American companies survive they might just get it – they might finally understand that Americans deserve and expect more.Do not be fooled by the stories of bad economy and poor sales! The U.S. automotive industry has done this to themselves!I am not saying that a bad economy does not exist but they have been on this road to destruction for a long time. I used to work in an Oldsmobile, Subaru dealership: in 1986 we sold all models from both manufacturers’, please allow me to cite two models from the 80’s to make my point.1) The Oldsmobile Cutlass Sierra wagon came with a 4-cylinder motor, air conditioning, A.M. radio, power steering, power brakes, the approximate retail price was 10k to 11k.2) The Subaru GL wagon came with 4-cylinder motor, air conditioning, F.M. stereo, power steering, power brakes, 4-wheel drive, power windows, power locks, split rear seats, rear defrost, multi position front seats with tilt, roof rack and more: the approximate retail price was 10k to 11k.The Olds had a reputation for having major motor problems and often would not survive past 100,000. By contrast, the Subaru was well known for surviving 200,000 miles plus with little motor troubles. In addition, there was a massive difference in standard comfort features for the same price – we sold Subaru’s at a rate of 40 to 1 compared to the Olds.The U.S automotive industry continued down that path for several years, as the price of vehicles rose dramatically they started to use financing tactics to sell their inferior products. The inevitable happened and many of the vehicles sold failed to last the term of the loans without major repairs and the resale value of a U.S. vehicle was poor so you could not trade them in without going financially backwards.Around 1990 U.S. automotive manufactures started to take heed, they produced some better quality vehicles and kept the prices more stable. Unfortunately, along with the better quality product came a substantial rise in part costs. Thus, repair bills began to skyrocket and continued to stay behind foreign competitors’ and their technology. Around 2000 it seemed we went downward again in the Quality department, around 2005 we started to rise some but I think it was far too little and a little too late.In 2008 Ford Motor Company had an ad campaign on stating they now had cars that with equivalent quality of Toyota. I don’t know about you, but if I owned a Ford I would feel like “Oh great, so the Ford I bought prior to 2008 was admittedly inferior!”U.S. automakers sponsor racing teams at a cost of millions of dollars per year: they continue to grossly overpay their executives: they have wildly exaggerated union worker compensation: and still, after at least 2 decades of foreign competitors nipping at their heels, they still stay so far behind in technology and quality. Quite frankly, I don’t understand why!Now, after years of inferior products, higher repair bills, exuberant executive payouts, must have unions in order to work in the plants, they put their hands out for the taxpayer to bail them out? There should be no question about the answer: a resounding NO!Thank you Mr. Ford for making the model T and further ushering in the industrial age, thank you U.S. auto manufacturing for providing good jobs for so many years: But you are a business after all and must hold to do or die like the rest of the business world!I am not advocating Americans should buy foreign products – especially in our current economic crisis! However, the majority of the working U.S. public has a limited amount of money for automobile purchases necessitating we use that limited amount wisely. With past and current conditions in the automotive industry higher quality, better comfort, more options for the same price suggests the foreign automotive makers provide “more bang for the buck”.(By the way, I own two American vehicles, one I am not pleased with at all and the other has so far *crossing fingers* been fantastic.)

What Can You Gain From Automotive Mechanic Courses?

Do you dream about working on cars? Love getting under the hood? A career as a mechanic may be the perfect fit for you.Automotive mechanic training programs will give you the skills you need to turn your passion for cars into a steady, rewarding auto repair career. Automotive mechanic graduates can go on to apprenticeships in some of the most successful automotive repair and service facilities in the province.Intensive diploma programs are designed to fully immerse the student into the role of an Automotive Service Technician. Instructors are often industry professionals with real world knowledge, who can execute an industry specific automotive mechanic training curriculum based on core industry components. Automotive Mechanic training programs rang from technical automotive theory, to diagnostics, to actually engaging in the repair and maintenance of automobiles (fixing cars), allowing student the chance to understand and retain the knowledge and skills needed to become competitive in the auto mechanic industry.Because of the varied nature of the profession, auto mechanic training programs are often very comprehensive in scope. Areas of study may include:
Brake Systems
ABS Systems
Starting Systems
Electrical Systems
Drivability Diagnostics
Fuel Systems
Fuel Injection Systems
Differentials
4×4 Systems
Computer Systems
EVAPS System
Exhaust System
Drive Clean (Inspector Certification – Emissions)
Heating & Air Conditioning
Ozone Depletion Certification (HRIA
Safety & Accessory Systems
Suspensions
Steering
General Maintenance Services
Engines (Gas & Diesel)
Transmissions (Automatic & Manual)
Driveline Systems
Cooling Systems
Ignition Systems
Tire & Wheel Service
Repair Facility Dynamics Structure
Safety
Professional Protocol
Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
Performance Standards
Effective Communication SkillsAside from gaining experience and knowledge in these areas, you will have the opportunity to be certified as an emissions inspector, and licensed to handle air conditioning refrigerants under your regional prevention rules, regulations and programs. These certifications, a necessity for many automotive mechanic jobs, will give you a definite edge in today’s repair and service job market.Graduates from comprehensive auto mechanic courses have found careers as:
Emissions Inspectors
Lube Specialists
Automotive Service Technician Apprentices
Farm Equipment Apprentices
Truck and Coach Mechanic Apprentices
Parts Counter
Forklift Mechanic Apprentices
Muffler Specialists
Front End Technicians
Electrical Specialists
Engine Technicians
Fuel Specialists
Tune Up Technicians
Diagnosticians
Emissions Specialists
Instructors
Transmission Specialists
Hybrid and Fuel Cell Technicians
Performance Specialists
Automotive Service Technicians
Journeyman Mechanics
Service Managers
Assistant Managers
Shop Foremen
Shop Managers or OwnersTurn your passion for cars into a rewarding, long-lasting career. Get started today in the auto mechanic industry with an intensive automotive mechanic training program.